SRM Tutorial Part 4: NetApp Ontap Simulator – Setup & configuration

Before I proceed with the SRM configuration, I show in part 4 & 5 of the tutorial how to setup & configure the NetApp Ontap Simulator including the replication with SnapMirror. Even if you are not using a NetApp system you should take at least a look on the second half of this part, where I show which datastores needs to be created for the SRM lab.

This part shows how to install the NetApp ONTAP Simulator and the basic configuration, which is required to share some NFS storage to a ESXi host.


SRM Tutorial Part 1: Lab setup
SRM Tutorial Part 2: Components & design
SRM Tutorial Part 3: SRM installation
SRM Tutorial Part 4: NetApp Ontap Simulator – Setup & configuration
SRM Tutorial Part 5: Configure NetApp SnapMirror
SRM Tutorial Part 6: SRA installation
SRM Tutorial Part 7: Configuration #1
SRM Tutorial Part 8: Configuration #2
SRM Tutorial Part 9: Advanced configuration & troubleshooting


Note: The following steps also apply if you are just looking for how to setup the ONTAP Simulator (without VMware SRM & vSphere).

Update 02/2013: By using this post by myself I stucked by the use of the command makedisks.main (showing a “ sudo: makedisks.main: command not found ”). I found out that there have been some syntax changes with the newest version 8.1.2 of the simulator and did an update to this post.

The NetApp ONTAP Simulator is available via the download portal on the NetApp page. You need to register to download the required files. I am going to use the 7-mode version in this tutorial.
You can select between an OVA-package (for vSphere) or a zip-bundle with all kind of VM files (for VMware Workstation).

After adding the VM to VMware Workstation in the first step I remove at least 2 of the default network adapters. If you don´t want to connect the ESXi hosts redundantly (which is not really necessary in a lab 🙂 ) you can also just go with a single adapter.

vm_settings


For the use of multiple ONTAP Simulators (e.g. for a SnapMirror replication) it´s necessary to change the serial number of the system. This step is not required if you use a single simulator.
Shortly after starting the VM you need to press a key (not ENTER) to get to the command prompt, before the system boots. Enter the following commands to change the serial.

set bootarg.nvram.sysid=1234567890
set SYS_SERIAL_NUM=1234567890
boot

change_serial


On the first start you need to enter the boot menu by pressing CTRL + C when prompted. Here you need to select option 4 to start with a system initialization, otherwise you will end up in an infinite boot loop. You need to confirm two warning messages with yes to reset the system and erase the disks.

boot_menu


The systems start with a setup wizard for an initial configuration. You need to enter IP addresses for the interfaces, subnet mask etc., all pretty much self-explaining.
Important: Make sure to enable the DNS resolver and enter a DNS server. A working and correct configured DNS is required for SnapMirror, which we are going to use in the SRM lab.

setup_wizard


Due to the fact we are using just a simulator there is some “CLI work” necessary to add a couple of disks to the system.

First we need to enable the diag user and provide a password.

priv set advanced
useradmin diaguser unlock
useradmin diaguser password



After enter…

systemshell

…you need to login with the user diag and the password you just assigned.


The following command order will add the disks to the shelfs:

setenv PATH "${PATH}:/usr/sbin"
cd /sim/dev
vsim_makedisks -h
sudo vsim_makedisks -n 14 -t 36 -a 2
sudo vsim_makedisks -n 14 -t 36 -a 3



Logout the diag user:

exit


Login again with the root user and assign all the disks, you just created.

disk show -n
disk assign all
disk show -v



For the connection between the SRA (which is installed in one of the next parts) and the storage system we need to set the following options:

options httpd.admin.access legacy
options httpd.admin.enable on



The last step we need to do on the CLI for now is to add a long list of licenses to the system. Of course you will need just a couple of them, but I don´t see a reason why not to add all.
Hint: Connect via SSH to the system and copy and paste the following block in a single operation.

license add MTVVGAF
license add DZDACHD
license add CEVIVFK
license add PZKEAZL
license add NAZOMKC
license add BKHEXNB
license add ADIPPVM
license add ANLEAZL
license add BSLRLTG
license add ELNRLTG
license add BQOEAZL
license add CYLGWWF
license add CGUKRDE
license add UYNXFJJ
license add RKBAFSN
license add HNGEAZL
license add ZOJPPVM
license add PTZZESN
license add BCJEAZL
license add COIRLTG
license add QZJTKCL
license add WICPMKC
license add UPDCBQH
license add DFVXFJJ
license add XJQIVFK
license add DNDCBQH
license add JQAACHD
license add ZYICXLC
license add PVOIVFK
license add PDXMQMI
license add RQAYBFE
license add ZOPRKAM
license add RIQTKCL
license add NQBYFJJ
license add JGFRLTG


If you haven´t installed the NetApp OnCommand System Manager it´s now time to do this. You can find it also in the download portal,which I mentioned on the beginning.
All the next steps I´m going to do via the System Manager. Especially if you are new to NetApp you get some hands on experience now instead of just copy a mass of CLI commands, which you properly won´t remember anyway.

After you started the System Manager you need to add your system/s to it. Afterwards you can login via double-click or the login-button.

oncommand_systemmanager

The first thing we are going to do here is to create a new aggregate out of the disks we added via the command line before. Select Aggregates on the left and click the Create button.

create_aggregate

An upcoming wizard will guide us through this process. Frist we need to specify a name for the new aggregate. We leave raid type and block format on the defaults.

wizard1

In the next window we select the disk group (there should be only one available).

wizard2

For this lab I create a raid group out of 14 disks, to leave some for other stuff later. You can configure this individual. Click Select Disks to specify the 14 disks.

wizard3

In the pop-up I choose 14 disks out of the 28 we recently created and click Ok.

wizard_popup

Check the summary and click on Create.

wizard4

The new aggregate is now shown in the list.

wizard5

Now you need to create some volumes on top of the recently created aggregate. Select Volumes on the left and click on Create.

volumes_create_netapp

For the SRM lab I create three volumes. A small one for the SRM placeholder files (more about this in a later part of this tutorial) and two other to store my virtual machines on. You need to define a name, select the correct aggregate (we created before), select the storage type (in this guide I’m going with NFS), specify the size and choose if you want to use thin provisioning for the volume (which makes sense in a lab with limited resources).

Note: I would suggest to use a different naming for the VM datastores on the secondary system. I like to add a “_secondary” on the end of the name. Otherwise it could be sometimes a little bit confusing if you are replicating between to volumes with exact the same name.

18

create_volume1



After you created the volumes select Exports on the left. You should see now export paths of your volumes you just created. In the last step we need to focus on the permissions of these exports on the bottom.

20

Select the existing Unix folder and click Edit.

unix_edit

In the upcoming windows you need to edit the Client Permissions section. There are two different cases, which needs different modification:

a) If you not want to use this datastore for replicated VM data (for use with SRM) just leave the default entry All hosts – Allow Read Write and add each IP address of the ESXi hosts with root access permissions.

b) In case you want to use this datastore to put VMs on it (which get protected by SRM) there are some special thing to consider with NetApp storage systems (not limited to the simulator): First you need to remove the entry All hosts – Allow Read Write. Afterwards you need to add the related SRM Server with read write permissions. Next you need to add each ESXi host with root access AND read write permissions.
Take a look at this KB article from VMware, which goes more in detail about this.

unix_permission2

Now we can switch over to the vSphere Client and add the datastores. Enter the DNS name of your NetApp system and use the path / folder, which you could see on the export list on the NetApp box before.

Important: For the SRM lab we only add all three datastores on the primary NetApp. On the secondary system only add the SRM placeholder datastore.

add_nfs_datastore

Finally the datastores are ready to use!

list_nfs_datastore_vsphere


On the end of this part of the SRM tutorial you should have installed two NetApp Simulators, one for each site.






Comments

  1. packetzapper says

    Very helpful – thanks !

  2. Hi, during my setup, I realize that the newly added 2 shelves cannot be recognized without a reboot. So after vsim_makedisks command, I have to do a reboot to continue.

  3. Also I have to enable NFS protocol. My simulator is 8.2.1

  4. I configured my Netapp Simulator in the same way as explained. However, am getting a strange issue that my ESXi host is not accepting the NAS connection from the Netapp Sim. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Am Getting the below error:

    NFS mount IPADDRESS:/vol/vol_vm_datastore01/q_nfs_ds01 failed: The
    NFS server does not support MOUNT version 3 over TCP.

    • vMario156 says

      Did you check if NFS is running on your NetApp Sim?
      I think its “nfs status” on the cli.

      Regards,
      Mario

  5. Hi,
    I deployed the netapp simulator on a ESXI server and tried the steps you have listed to configure. I am trying to enter boot menu by pressing CTRL-C, but strangely nothing comes up. Any idea on how to proceed?

    Thanks
    Sree

Trackbacks

  1. […] 1: Lab setup SRM Tutorial Part 2: Components & design SRM Tutorial Part 3: SRM installation SRM Tutorial Part 4: NetApp Ontap Simulator – Setup & configuration SRM Tutorial Part 5: Configure NetApp SnapMirror SRM Tutorial Part 6: SRA installation SRM Tutorial […]

  2. […] 1: Lab setup SRM Tutorial Part 2: Components & design SRM Tutorial Part 3: SRM installation SRM Tutorial Part 4: NetApp Ontap Simulator – Setup & configuration SRM Tutorial Part 5: Configure NetApp SnapMirror SRM Tutorial Part 6: SRA installation SRM Tutorial […]

  3. […] 1: Lab setup SRM Tutorial Part 2: Components & design SRM Tutorial Part 3: SRM installation SRM Tutorial Part 4: NetApp Ontap Simulator – Setup & configuration SRM Tutorial Part 5: Configure NetApp SnapMirror SRM Tutorial Part 6: SRA installation SRM Tutorial […]

  4. […] 1: Lab setup SRM Tutorial Part 2: Components & design SRM Tutorial Part 3: SRM installation SRM Tutorial Part 4: NetApp Ontap Simulator – Setup & configuration SRM Tutorial Part 5: Configure NetApp SnapMirror SRM Tutorial Part 6: SRA installation SRM Tutorial […]

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